Category Archives: Workout

Shouldn’t I Run??

The following article is for those that want to lose weight (specifically fat). If you are running for competition, training for a 5K / 10K / 10 miler, etc., I would have completely different recommendations for you as I used to be a competitive runner myself. However I would still recommend training as I describe below until you have reduced your fat content to near athlete levels before beginning a serious running program (one that required you to run significant miles each week) as less carried weight will put much less stress on your joints, and we can do many other things to improve your cardio capacity in between. So if you are a man, you shouldn’t start running long distances if your gut measures 37 inches or a woman with a gut over 32 inches around. Build significant strength around your joints first. Build in extra muscle mass to aid in the absorption of the pounding stress first.

But Shouldn’t I Run On My Cardio Days …

I get asked questions about running all the time. 6 days a week you should be doing some type of workout. The body needs daily exercise. However it is good to give the body one day per week of near complete rest so that you can push yourself harder during the next week and there is also the added benefit of breaking the pattern so that it is more difficult for the body to adapt and reach a plateau. So with the idea that doing something is good, doing more is better, and the more difficult it is, better still but limited to your current level of conditioning and strength / endurance. This is important so that you don’t over train and cause the body to reduce it’s calorie burn and enter a healing only mode where you just don’t have any energy. Go hard, but as part of a program! You can’t go hard all the time. Take breaks, change it up.

Perhaps the most frequent question about I get about running is when I tell people they should be walking at a brisk pace 3 days a week (three resistance training days, three cardio days). “Shouldn’t I be running on those days?”

Well let’s look at your goals and time commitment to answer that question. Then let’s take a look at the underlying assumptions that prompt questions about running. The number one goal of my clients is to lose weight and tone up as quickly as possible. And most of my clients really don’t have more than 30 min to an hour each day to devote to working out. If you have 3 or 4 hours of time each day you can devote to working out, I would have different advice for you.

Now let’s take a look at the underlying assumptions regarding why running seems like such a good thing to do, especially when doing more is better, and harder still is better still. When you see a long distance runner (athletes competing at distances greater than a mile such as a 10K or a marathon) on TV winning the race, whether it is a man or a woman, they are always thin. When you meet a thin person, they frequently speak about their daily runs. When you walk into a traditional gym you see a lot of people running on the treadmills. For the last several decades, running has been highly publicized as a great way to lose weight. So why don’t I recommend it on your cardio days?

Let’s take a deeper look at distance runners and compare them to sprinters. You may only pay attention to runners during major world events such as the olympics, but think back to the impressions you are left with after watching these world class athletes. While both types of runners are certainly thin, one group has less body fat and looks much healthier. Which group has less body fat? Is it the long distance runner, the one that runs 5, 10 or 20 plus miles every day and rarely if ever lifts weights? Or is it the sprinter that probably never runs more than half a mile at at time for warm up, while running many sprints or intervals and lifting large, very heavy weights. Without thinking about it, most of my clients subconsciously believes that long distance runners have lower body fat. But they quickly see that world class sprinters actually have the lower body weight. Distance runners are thin to looking sickly as they have lost all their upper body muscle so that their bodies can efficiently fun long distances while burning as few calories as possible. Their bodies are lopsided in their development, toned legs, stick arms and bony chests. At first sight, they appear to have very low body fat percentages, but as you look closer, you realize that you can’t tell how low it is, but you assume it is lower than yours. However would you believe they have 2 to 3 times the body fat of their sprinter cousins? They need more fat to be able to sustain their bodies over long distances.

Sprinters on the other hand have nicely muscled and balanced bodies. Their upper bodies are built in proportion to their lower bodies. And you don’t have to guess that their body fat percentage is low, it is obvious. Their skin is taught against powerful muscles. Their stomachs do not protrude in front of their chest. It’s not uncommon to find these athletes to have only 3, 4 or 5 percent body fat. And since they have so much more muscle as a percentage of their body weight, they find it far easier to avoid getting fatter. Remember more muscle raises your resting metabolic rate (muscle burns more calories than fat all day long).

And now the point that really drove this home for me (for I too used to believe that running was the answer to all my weight loss needs, but I never go for a run anymore, haven’t in years). Every year I see the coverage of famous marathons like the Boston Marathon. The winners are all rail thin (none of my clients seem to think this is an attractive look – men with bird chests and women without boobs!). But if you look at the folks that finish in the last third, they are all FAT. How is this possible, I used to ask myself. It really befuddled me as I know what it takes to train the body to the level where it can run 26.2 miles straight. You see I used to run 5 to 16 miles every day (well at least 6 days a week). And even at that level of training, I was not capable of competitively running a marathon. However when I stopped running I put on a ton of weight. But I digress. How does a person remain fat that can run 26.2 miles straight? How in the world is this possible. Well, initially the person training for such a long distance will lose weight. But quickly they hit a plateau, and more and more running is offset by the body becoming more and more efficient with it’s energy consumption until the runner reaches a plateau. Week by week goes by and the body achieves more and greater endurance. And so the body becomes so efficient with it’s consumption of energy that it can run 26.2 miles while staying fat. Of course many people cut their calories while doing this, thus thoroughly confusing themselves.

In fact I have clients that have done mainly cardio workouts for 2 years and gotten fatter the entire time. When I switched them to strength building resistance workouts, the results were immediate. Body fat went down.

So if you are interested in quick weight loss that won’t be permanent go for long runs and burn a bunch of calories. However if you want to lose this weight forever, you need to build muscle while allowing the body to rest between intense workouts with brisk walks or tennis or similar activities that are not at a steady state running level of exertion.

I know some of you will ignor my advice because you have simply had too many years of brain washing about the huge benefits of running long distances, including getting fat to burn away (I’m sure you have heard that you have to have your heart rate beating in the target range for 20 minutes to burn any fat – perhaps, but intervals and building muscle works better because this raises your resting metabolic rate, not just during the workout such as with a long run – you only burn calories for a short time after a long run, but after an intense resistance workout, your calorie burn may be increased for up to 48 hours). So if you must run, then do intervals where you sprint for 30 sec to a min and walk for 30 sec to a min. But some of you will ignor that and just run. If you are going to do this, then only go for runs once a week. Then pay close attention to how hungry you will be, and how often you will want to eat simple carbs.

When’s the best time to run? Do interval runs right after you finish your resistance training workout, not before. This will intensify the workout. Then walk the next day.

Now for other benefits of not running long distance. Just think of all the shin splints, knee aches, ankle aches and hip aches you will avoid.

In conclusion, to reach your goal of losing weight, complete 3 resistance training sessions each week and walk at a brisk pace 3 other days each week. If you must run, run intervals. And it’s best to do them on the days you do your resistance training.

To you health!

Coach Charles

The Standard Warm Up Session

The Warm Up Exercises** (7 to 10 min):
These exercises will take your body through a full range of motion and bring blood to all the muscles in your body in preparation of more strenuous movement. “BW” stands for body weight only.
1.    Box Squats x10 (sit back onto the edge of a chair or box or until thighs parallel to the ground)  (BW)
2.    Alternating Forward Lunges/ Reverse Lunges x 5L/5R* (BW) (only do the reverse lunges if you are competent with the forward lunges)
3.    Toe Touches (Alternating Reaching Lunges) x 5L/5R (BW) (back leg is straight, front leg is bent at knee – touch toes)
4.    Knee or Full Push ups x 10 (begin with hands on floor or on dumbbells from the knee, progress to from the toes and progress to hands on stability ball) (BW) – you may also place your hands on the second through 4 th steps of your stair case and toes on the ground, move your hands down the steps to increase difficulty.
5.    Pull aparts x 20 – 25 (light to challenging resistance band)
6.    Hanging, Dip Bar or Reclining Leg raise or knee ups on floor or on bench x 10- 15 (BW)
7.    Optional: Face pulls x 20 – 25 (light to challenging resistance band) or second set of Pull aparts (do this exercise if you can easily complete the first set of pull aparts)
8.    360 degree medicine ball circles – ball overhead, circle to one side while bringing ball directly between your feet to about 4 inches off the ground, continue circle as you rise out of squat to fully standing position with ball overhead, x 10 -15 (if no ball, you may also hold a dumbbell between your hands)
Note: If you feel like you are going to pass out or throw up at this point, you are not ready to move to the next part of the warm up yet.

The Warm Up Movements (25’ progress to 100’ for each movement):
These movements will challenge your nervous system to create new muscle memory movements and improve your overall mobility. Best performed outside.
DO THIS:
1.    Ride bike, march in place, jump on rebounder (mini-trampoline), jumping jacks or jump rope for 3 to 5 minutes then progress to:
OR DO THIS not both (3 to 7 min):
1.    Forward jog up, jog backwards back (50’ progress to 100’)
2.    Forward skip up, skip backwards back
3.    High knees on the way up, turn around, forward facing butt kicks back
4.    Shuffle facing one side on the way up, then facing same side shuffle back in opposite direction (crouched position like guarding someone in basketball – lateral movement)
5.    Walking lunges up, turn around, accelerate into sprint, then decelerate to stop on way back

To your Health!

Coach Charles

FitHealth Athlete’s Program Phase 1 Workout

This workout is for people that are currently athletes or have recently been athletes and need to get back into competitive shape again. This workout is seriously demanding. It is highly advised that you meet with me the first time you try this workout. The lifts are technically difficult with many places for you to hurt yourself. However, mastery of this workout will prepare you for major athletic events such as in the ring combat. It’s always recommended that you consult a doctor before beginning any new workout or nutrition program.

This post will be updated soon!

FitHealth Fitness Program Phase 1 Workout

FitHealth Fitness Program Phase I Workout

This is the initial workout FitHealth Fitness Program members complete. It is always advisable to consult your doctor before starting a new fitness or nutrition program.

Required Equipment:

FitHealth Fitness workouts require the following equipment. All items can be purchased at Dicks or other sporting goods stores.  If you are inclined to run all over town for good deals, Craigslist can be a good place to find exercise items, but there is no guarantee that they will have everything you need, when you need it.

•    Stability Ball 55 cm for shorter folks, 65 cm for average height men, 75 cm for folks over 6 ‘ or 6’ 1” (it really depends on how tall your legs are – you should be able to sit on top of the ball with a significant bend in your knees so that you can easily keep your balance with your feet on the floor). The salesperson should be able to help make sure you get the right size.
•    Medicine ball – I recommend most people start with a 4 – 6 lb ball. Get the kind that bounces (made of rubber).  If you have a soccer ball or basketball in good condition that will hold your body weight, that will work until you find the medicine ball you want.
•    Dumbbells – 3 pairs, ideally a light pair, a pair heavy enough to challenge you and a pair you would consider heavy at your current strength level. So you might have a pair of 5’s, 10’s and 20’s OR 10’s, 20’s and 30’s
•    Resistance bands – Dicks has a package of three bands in one with an attachment to work with doors – “Ultimate ProGym in a Bag.”  I recommend this one or purchasing the ones from http://www.ironwoodyfitness.com/ they have light ones for doing things like pull aparts and face pulls and heavy duty ones that you can use to support part of your body weight to do assisted pull ups.
•    Pull up bar – they have several different kinds out on the market. I recommend the kind you can get that hangs from your doorframe without having to install it. That way you can easily remove it from the doorframe when you are finished with your workout. Iron Gym is a popular choice.

The FitHealth Fitness Program Workout Phase I:
If you cannot complete this workout within 45 minutes to an hour, you should start with the FitHealth Fat Loss Program Phase 1 Workout (http://fithealthjournal.wordpress.com/2009/03/27/fithealth-fat-loss-program-phase-i-workout/). Do not be embarrassed by your current state of fitness. It is what it is. These exercises will challenge your current level of mobility, balance, flexibility and stamina. However if you do not push yourself a little further each time, you will not force your body to make the necessary changes that will result in greater strength and greater burn of calories throughout the day. This workout should be completed 3 days a week. The other days you should walk 30 min. And take one day per week completely off to allow your body to rest and recover.

VIDEO COMING SOON

The Warm Up Exercises** (7 to 10 min):
These exercises will take your body through a full range of motion and bring blood to all the muscles in your body in preparation of more strenuous movement.
1.    Box Squats x10 (sit back onto the edge of a chair or box, knees 90 degrees)  (BW)
2.    Alternating Forward Lunges/ Reverse Lunges x 5L/5R* (BW)
3.    Alternating Reaching Lunges x 5L/5R (BW)
4.    Knee or Full Push ups x 10 (begin with hands on floor or on dumbbells from the knee, progress to from the toes and progress to hands on stability ball) (BW)
5.    Pull aparts x 20 – 25 (light to challenging resistance band)
6.    Reclining Leg raise on floor or bench x 12- 15 (BW)
7.    Face pulls x 20 – 25 (light to challenging resistance band)
8.    360 degree medicine ball circles – ball overhead, circle to one side while bringing ball directly between your feet to about 4 inches off the ground, continue circle as you rise out of squat to fully standing position with ball overhead, x 10 -15
Note: If you feel like you are going to pass out or throw up at this point, you are not ready to move to the next part of the warm up yet.

The Warm Up Movements (25’ progress to 100’ for each movement):
These movements will challenge your nervous system to create new muscle memory movements and improve your overall mobility. Best performed outside.
DO THIS:
1.    Ride bike, march in place, jump on rebounder (mini-trampoline) or jump rope for 3 to 5 minutes then progress to:
OR DO THIS not both (3 to 7 min):
1.    Forward jog up, jog backwards back (50’ progress to 100’)
2.    Forward skip up, skip backwards back
3.    High knees on the way up, turn around, forward facing butt kicks back
4.    Shuffle facing one side on the way up, then facing same side shuffle back in opposite direction (crouched position like guarding someone in basketball – lateral movement)
5.    Walking lunges up, turn around, accelerate into sprint, then decelerate to stop on way back
Note: If you feel like you are going to pass out or throw up at this point, you are not ready to move to the workout yet.

* 5L/5R means 5 reps left side followed by 5 reps right side (start with weak side)
** Roll out with medicine ball if needed before, always at end
** Mobility if needed – rotate all joints through full range of motion with assistance of chair or some other support as needed.

The Workout – Conduct 3 to 5 circuits with 30 sec rests between exercises and a 2 min rest between circuits.

1.    One arm dumbbell snatch squat x 3-5 reps L/R, explosively lift dumbbell from ground to straight overhead, resist dumbbell with lat muscle as you lower dumbbell to shoulder, squat down, then lower dumbbell from shoulder to ground, that’s one rep. Variation – leave dumbbell in raised above head position, then squat. Then lower dumbbell to ground.
2.    Reclining Bar Row x 5 -8 sub max reps (stop one or two reps before muscle exhaustion), Set up pull up bar and tall chair. In reclining position, grip bar and place heels on chair. Pull chest up to bar.
3.    Knee or Full Push Ups (one hand on block or thick phone book, one hand on ground – progress to one hand on ball and staggered hand placement) x 3 – 6 reps, then switch hands, change grips and hand positions with each circuit (e.g. widely spaced hands push ups verses hands close together “diamond” push ups or one book offset verses thick phone book)
4.    Two handed dumbbell swings x 15 – 20 reps, dead lift dumbbell, bump dumbbell out from hips and allow dumbbell to swing back between your legs as if you were going to hike pass a football, then keeping back flat and abs braced, begin swing from hips moving forward and standing straight up, dumbbell should swing through the air as if attached to ropes (just finger tips grasping the top section of the dumbbell – you are NOT lifting the dumbbell with your hands, the momentum created by your hips and standing up propels the dumbbell into a swing up to about your chest height).
5.    Burpees x 8 – 10 reps. From standing position, squat down and place your hands on the ground next to and outside your feet. Thrust your feet back into a plank position, do one push up, then jump your feet back to between your hands and then jump up and clap your hands above your head. That is one rep.
6.    Superman, hold 30 to 60 seconds. While lying on the ground with arms and legs stretched out, raise and hold both arms and both legs at the same time.
7.    Pull Aparts – 20 – 25
8.    Stability ball crunch x 15 – 30 reps. Progress to holding medicine ball on chest. Progress to adding twist to movement.
9.    Grip – grab and hold the top of your dumbbell off the ground for as long as you can hold it. While gripping, try to crush the top of the dumbbell with your fingertips.

Post Workout Recovery (5 to 10 min)
10.    Roll out – place medicine ball on ground and then get on top of the ball. Roll out all muscle tissue (not bone). This will feel strange at first, but will reduce soreness and formation of knots in the future. The point pressure from the ball is just like getting a massage. Treat it as such.
11.    Stretch out your body. Ensure that your hamstrings and spine are completely stretched out. Other key areas include your thighs, chest and shoulders.

Coach Charles

FitHealth Fat Loss Program Phase I Workout

FitHealth Fat Loss Phase I

Required Equipment:

FitHealth Fat Loss workouts require the following equipment. All items can be purchased at Dicks or other sporting goods stores.  If you are inclined to run all over town for good deals, Craigslist can be a good place to find exercise items, but there is no guarantee that they will have everything you need, when you need it.

•    Stability Ball 55 cm for shorter folks, 65 cm for average height men, 75 cm for folks over 6 ‘ or 6’ 1” (it really depends on how tall your legs are – you should be able to sit on top of the ball with a significant bend in your knees so that you can easily keep your balance with your feet on the floor). The salesperson should be able to help make sure you get the right size.
•    Medicine ball – I recommend most people start with a 4 – 6 lb ball. Get the kind that bounces (made of rubber).  If you have a soccer ball or basketball in good condition that will hold your body weight, that will work until you find the medicine ball you want.
•    Dumbells – 3 pairs, ideally a light pair, a pair heavy enough to challenge you and a pair you would consider heavy at your current strength level. So you might have a pair of 5’s, 10’s and 20’s OR 10’s, 20’s and 30’s
•    Resistance bands – Dicks has a package of three bands in one with an attachment to work with doors – “Ultimate ProGym in a Bag.”  I recommend this one or purchasing the ones from http://www.ironwoodyfitness.com/ they have light ones for doing things like pull aparts and face pulls and heavy duty ones that you can use to support part of your body weight to do assisted pull ups.
•    Pull up bar – they have several different kinds out on the market. I recommend the kind you can get that hangs from your doorframe without having to install it. That way you can easily remove it from the doorframe when you are finished with your workout. Iron Gym is a popular choice.

The FitHealth Fat Loss Workout Phase I:
If you cannot complete this workout within 45 minutes to an hour, you should start with the FitHealth Fat Loss Program Baseline Workout (http://fithealthjournal.wordpress.com/2009/03/26/fatlossbaseline/). Do not be embarrassed by your current state of fitness. It is what it is. These exercises will challenge your current level of mobility, balance, flexibility and stamina. However if you do not push yourself a little further each time, you will not force your body to make the necessary changes that will result in greater strength and greater burn of calories throughout the day. This workout should be completed 3 days a week. The other days you should walk 30 min. And take one day per week completely off to allow your body to rest and recover.

VIDEO COMING SOON

The Warm Up Exercises** (7 to 15 min):
These exercises will take your body through a full range of motion and bring blood to all the muscles in your body in preparation of more strenuous movement.
1.    Medicine ball overhead press into squatting ball slam x 6 – 12
2.    Forward Lunges x 5L/5R* (BW)
3.    Alternating Reaching Lunges x 5L/5R (BW)
4.    Chest Shoulder Stabilization
a.    Stability Ball Plank – arms fully extended (hold 20 sec, progress to 1 min)
OR
b.    Knee or Full Push ups x 10 (begin with hands on floor or on dumbbells from the knee, progress to from the toes and progress to hands on stability ball) (BW)
5.    Pull aparts x 10 – 25 (light to challenging resistance band)
6.    Reclining Leg raise on floor or bench x 8 – 15 (BW)
7.    Face pulls x 10 – 25 (light to challenging resistance band)
8.    360 degree medicine ball circles – ball overhead, circle to one side while bringing ball directly between your feet to about 4 inches off the ground, continue circle as you rise out of squat to fully standing position with ball overhead,  x 6 -15
Note: If you feel like you are going to pass out or throw up at this point, you are not ready to move to the next part of the warm up yet.

The Warm Up Movements (25’ progress to 100’ for each movement):
These movements will challenge your nervous system to create new muscle memory movements and improve your overall mobility. Best performed outside.
DO THIS:
1.    Ride bike, march in place, jump on rebounder (mini-trampoline) or jump rope for 3 to 5 minutes then progress to:
OR DO THIS not both (3 to 7 min):
1.    Forward jog up, turn around, Skip forward back (25’ progress to 100’)
2.    High knees on the way up, turn around, forward facing butt kicks back
3.    Shuffle facing one side on the way up, then facing same side shuffle back in opposite direction (crouched position like guarding someone in basketball – lateral movement)
Note: If you feel like you are going to pass out or throw up at this point, you are not ready to move to the workout yet.

* 5L/5R means 5 reps left side followed by 5 reps right side (start with weak side)
** Roll out with medicine ball if needed before, always at end
** Mobility if needed – rotate all joints through full range of motion with assistance of chair or some other support as needed.

The Workout – Conduct 3 to 5 circuits with 30 sec rests between exercises and a 2 min rest between circuits.

1.    One arm dumbbell push press squat x 3-5 reps L/R, dumbbell from ground to shoulder, dip legs 2 to 4 inches, straighten legs and carry momentum to lock out elbow overhead, resist dumbbell with lat muscle as you lower dumbbell to shoulder, squat down, then lower dumbbell from shoulder to ground, that’s one rep
2.    Standing Resistance Band Row  x 8 – 12 sub max reps (stop one or two reps before muscle exhaustion), pull resistance bands against pole, door handle or closed door with correct attachment)
3.    Knee or Full Push Ups (one hand on block or thick phone book, one hand on ground – progress to one hand on ball and staggered hand placement) x 3 – 6 reps, then switch hands, change grips and hand positions with each circuit (e.g. widely spaced hands push ups verses hands close together “diamond” push ups or one book offset verses thick phone book)
4.    Two handed dumbbell swings x 10 – 20 reps, dead lift dumbbell, bump dumbbell out from hips and allow dumbbell to swing back between your legs as if you were going to hike pass a football, then keeping back flat and abs braced,  begin swing from hips moving forward and standing straight up, dumbbell should swing through the air as if attached to ropes (just finger tips grasping the top section of the dumbbell – you are NOT lifting the dumbbell with your hands, the momentum created by your hips and standing up propels the dumbbell into a swing up to about your chest height).
5.    Squat thrusts x 8 -10 reps. From standing position, squat down and place your hands on the ground next to and outside your feet. Thrust your feet back into a plank position, then jump your feet back to between your hands and stand completely up. That is one rep. Progress to burpees. The burpee adds a push up when you are in the plank position before you bring your feet back to your hands. Then instead of standing up, you jump up and clap your hands above your head.
6.    Half superman x 8 – 15 reps R/L, progress to full superman held for up to 60 seconds. The half superman is done while laying on your stomach, hands out stretched out above your head. Raise opposite arm and leg, keep leg straight. Full superman is raising and holding both arms and both legs at the same time.
7.    Stability ball crunch x 8 – 15 reps. Progress to holding medicine ball on chest. Progress to adding twist to movement.
8.    Grip – grab and hold the top of your dumbbell off the ground for as long as you can hold it. While gripping, try to crush the top of the dumbbell with your fingertips.

Post Workout Recovery (5 to 10 min)
9.    Roll out – place medicine ball on ground and then get on top of the ball. Roll out all muscle tissue (not bone). This will feel strange at first, but will reduce soreness and formation of knots in the future. The point pressure from the ball is just like getting a massage. Treat it as such.
10.    Stretch out your body. Ensure that your hamstrings and spine are completely stretched out. Other key areas include your thighs, chest and shoulders.

Coach Charles

FitHealth Fat Loss Baseline Workout

So you are finally ready to get rid of the fat permanently! Well you came to right place. FitHealth Fat Loss Program members start with this workout. Use common sense and enjoy. It’s always recommended that you consult a doctor before beginning any new workout or nutrition program.

FitHealth Fat Loss Baseline Workout

Required Equipment:

The FitHealth Fat Loss Baseline workout requires the following equipment if you will be doing additional workouts at home outside of our gym workouts or are on the FitHealth Distance Coaching Program. All items can be purchased at Dicks or other sporting goods stores. If you are inclined to run all over town for good deals, Craigslist can be a good place to find exercise items, but there is no guarantee that they will have everything you need, when you need it.

• Medicine ball – I recommend most people start with a 4 lb or 6 lb ball (it’s just a few dollars more). Get the kind that has some bounce (made of rubber) not the sand filled version that does not hold it’s shape and is covered with leather (typical old school version – very useful for throwing and catching, but not as useful for stability work). If you have a soccer ball or basketball in good condition that will hold your body weight, it will work until you find the medicine ball you want.
• Resistance bands – Dicks has a package of three bands in one with an attachment to work with doors – “Ultimate ProGym in a Bag.” I recommend this one or purchasing the ones from http://www.ironwoodyfitness.com/ they have light ones for doing things like pull aparts and face pulls and heavy duty ones that you can use to support part of your body weight to do assisted pull ups.
• Pull up bar – they have several different kinds out on the market. I recommend the kind you can get that hangs from your doorframe without having to install it. That way you can easily remove it from the doorframe when you are finished with your workout. Iron Gym is a popular choice.

The FitHealth Fat Loss Baseline Workout:
Do not be embarrassed by your current state of fitness. It is what it is. And the only way you will know you are improving is to compare against your initial capabilities as you complete the workout. So write down in the exercise log how many reps you do for each exercise. These exercises will challenge your current level of mobility, balance, flexibility and stamina. Therefore you may need to allow yourself to gradually build into the complete workout, rather than doing the complete workout one time and getting so sore and stiff for the next 5 days that you decide to give up on your goal of losing the fat. However if you do not push yourself a little further each time, you will not force your body to make the necessary changes that will result in greater strength, mobility and additional calorie burn throughout the day. This workout should be completed 3 days a week and take 35 min to an hour. The other days you should walk 30 min. And take one day per week completely off to allow your body to rest and recover. Watch the associated video to learn proper technique.

The Warm Up Exercises** (7 to 15 min):
These exercises will take your body through a full range of motion and bring blood to all the muscles in your body in preparation of more strenuous movement.
1. March in place x 1-3 min
2. Medicine ball overhead press into squatting ball slam x 6 – 12
3. Static Standing Lunges x 1L/1R* hold 10 – 15 sec
4. Straight Arm Plank – arms fully extended – hold 10 – 15 sec
5. Pull Aparts x 10 – 25 (light resistance band)
6. Reclining Bent Knee Raise on floor or bench x 8 progress to 15 (BW)
7. Standing Medicine Ball Twist x 5L/5R
Note: If you feel like you are going to pass out or throw up at this point, you are not ready to move on to the actual workout phase.

* 1L/1R means 1 rep left side followed by 1 rep right side (start with weak side)
** Roll out with medicine ball if needed before, always at end
** Mobility if needed – rotate all joints through full range of motion with assistance of chair or some other support as needed.
The Workout (15 to 25 min)
Complete each exercise as part of a circuit. Do exercise 1, followed by exercise 2, then 3, then 4, then take a one minute break and start the circuit over again with exercise 1. Begin with one full circuit, then progress to two – five circuits.

1. Standing Resistance Band Row – 8 to 12 sub max reps (stop one or two reps before muscle exhaustion), pull resistance bands against pole, door handle or closed door with correct attachment)
2. Standing Resistance Band Chest Press – 8 to 12 sub max reps
3. Bear Walk. Face down on hands and feet and walk across the room. (10’ – 20’)
4. Crab Walk. On the way back turn over so that you are facing the ceiling and walk back on hands and feet keeping hips raised and butt off the ground. (10’ – 20’)
5. Half superman– 8 to 15 reps R/L, progress to full superman held for up to 60 seconds. The half superman is done while laying on your stomach, hands out stretched out above your head. Raise opposite arm and leg, keep leg straight. Full superman is raising and holding both arms and both legs at the same time.

Post Workout Recovery (5 to 10 min)
1. Roll out – place medicine ball on ground and then get on top of the ball. Roll out all muscle tissue (not bone). This will feel strange at first, but will reduce soreness and formation of knots in the future. The point pressure from the ball is just like getting a massage. Treat it as such.
2. Stretch out your body. Ensure that your hamstrings and spine are completely stretched out. Other key areas include your thighs, chest and shoulders.

Coach Charles